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August 22, 2014

United States

Colorado—Nutrinsic’s Biofloc Feed

 

Nutrinsic Corporation is introducing a new high-protein feed ingredient called “ProFloc”™, a single-cell protein produced by using the company’s patented technology to recycle nutrients from the wastewaters of the food and beverage industries

 

The Nutrinsic process involves modifying biological conditions in existing wastewater systems to favor bioflocs and the growth of protein producing bacteria that are safe, non-GMO and native to the system.  Nutrinsic then harvests these bacteria in a straightforward process of concentration, drying and sterilizing to produce a single cell protein containing 60% protein for inclusion in animal feeds.

 

In tests at Texas A&M’s Mariculture Research Lab, at inclusion rates of 8% in white shrimp diets, ProFloc resulted in 9% faster growth, 8% larger shrimp and 16% better feed conversion ratios than fishmeal.

 

A study with ProFloc, conducted in a commercial shrimp pond in Ecuador, increased growth rates by as much as 10%.

 

Leo Gingras, Nutrinsic CEO, says: “ProFloc...has a favorable amino acid profile, high digestibility, long shelf life, and is highly palatable to animals of all types.  It is sustainable, produced from food and beverage nutrients that would otherwise be lost, and it is cost effective.”

 

Nutrinsic is completing construction of its first production facility for ProFloc in Trenton, Ohio, USA, slated to come on-line by the end 2014.

 

Information: Leo Gingras, CEO, and Megan Wairama, Marketing Manager, Nutrinsic Corporation, 603 South Cherry Street, Suite 314, Glendale, Colorado, USA (email meagan.wairama@nutrinsic.co, phone 1-702-744-3600m webpage http://nutrinsic.com).

 

Sources: 1. Email to Shrimp News International from Meagan Wairama.  Subject: New Sustainable Protein for Animal Nutrition Introduced by Nutrinsic.  August 22, 2014.  2. Nutrinsic’s Website on August 22, 2014.  3. A Nutrinsic PDF.  Single Cell Protein for Animal Nutrition.  Received August 22, 2014.

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