Shrimp Farming at "Aquaculture 2007"
World Aquaculture Society Meeting, San Antonio, Texas, USA
February 26 through March 2, 2007


To SEARCH this page, hit Control-F
To find the next occurrence of your search, hit Control-G.


United States Marine Shrimp Farming Program
Info on Aquaculture in Texas
Bio-Floc Session
Feed Short Course
Shrimp Farming in Texas--Map and Statistics
Texas Farm Leases Ponds
Texas Farm Sells Shrimp Online
The History of Shrimp Farming in West Texas
Trade Show Exhibitors



United States Marine Shrimp Farming Program
TOP OF PAGE


The United States Marine Shrimp Farming Program (USMSFP) will sponsor the shrimp sessions at "Aquaculture 2007", a World Aquaculture Society meeting scheduled for February 26 through March 2, 2007, in San Antonio, Texas. In addition to sponsoring the shrimp sessions, Anthony Ostrowski, Ph.D., director of USMSFP, said USMSFP will host a special reception for the United States marine shrimp farming industry that will encourage one-on-one contact with program scientists.

Information: Anthony Ostrowski, The Oceanic Institute, 41-202 Kalanianaole Highway, Waimanalo, HI 96795 USA (phone 808-259-3109, fax 808-259-3121, email aostrowski@oceanicinstitute.org, webpage www.oceanicinstitute.org).

Source: Industry Briefs (The newsletter of the United States Marine Shrimp Farming Program). Paula Bender, Editor and Webmaster (pbender@oceanicinstitute.org). See you at WAS Aquaculture 2007--Science for Sustainable Aquaculture. V-12, N-4, P-7, October 2006.




Information on Aquaculture in Texas
TOP OF PAGE


If you're looking for information on "Aquaculture 2007", the World Aquaculture Society meeting that's scheduled for February 26 to March 2, 2007, in San Antonio, Texas, go the Society's conference page at http://www.was.org/meetings/ConferenceInfo.asp?MeetingCode=AQ2007.

If you're looking for information on San Antonio or aquaculture in Texas, go to the Texas Aquaculture Association's webpage at http://www.texasaquaculture.org/index.html.

Information: John Cooksey, World Aquaculture Conference Management, P.O. Box 2302, Valley Center, CA 92082 USA (phone 760-751-5005, fax 760-751-5003, email worldaqua@aol.com, webpage, www.was.org).

Sources: 1. World Aquaculture Society Website. December 6, 2006. 2. Texas Aquaculture Association Website. December 6, 2006.



Tentative Program for the Bio-Floc Session
TOP OF PAGE



At the World Aquaculture Society Meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA (February 15, 2006), a special, all-day session brought people from around the world together to discuss bio-floc shrimp farming. They formed a working group within WAS to facilitate communications among interested parties, gave the technology its name--"bio-floc" aquaculture--and established a home for the group at the Agricultural Engineering Society's website (http://www.aesweb.org/starter.htm, click on Bio-Floc Workgroup in the left hand column).

Dr. Yoram Avnimelech has taken the lead in the bio-floc aquaculture movement. Yoram is head of the Sea of Galilee Water Shed Research Unit (Israel), Chief Scientist of the Israeli Ministry of the Environment, and Dean of the Department of Agricultural Engineering at Technion (the Israel Institute of Technology), where he holds the Samuel Gorney Chair. He has done consulting work in Israel, the United States, South America, Australia and Thailand and has been a visiting professor in various countries, including Belgium, the United States, Australia and the Netherlands. He has published more than a hundred papers in refereed journals, edited four books and trained many graduate students.

Yoram is putting together the program for the bio-floc session at the WAS meeting in San Antonio, Texas, USA, scheduled for Wednesday, February 28, 2007. Here's the tentative program. Both the morning and afternoon sessions will be followed by discussions.



Morning Session Chairman: Yoram Acnimelech



Management of Nitrogen Cycling and Microbial Populations in BioFloc-Based Aquaculture Systems (Peter Van Wyk and Yoram Avnimelech)

Roselien Crab Added Value of Microbial Life in Flocs (Willy Verstraete, P. De Schryver and Tom Defoirdt)

Fish Waste Management by Conversion into Heterotrophic Bacteria Biomass (Oliver Schneider, Vasiliki Sereti, E.H. Eding and Johan Verreth)

Impact of Carbon/Nitrogen Balance and Modeling of the Nitrogen Removal Processes in Microbial-Based Aquaculture Systems (James M. Ebeling and Michael B. Timmons)


Afternoon Session Chairman: Greg Boardman



Biological Treatment of Wastewaters to Generate Microbial Flocs for Shrimp Culture D.D. Kuhn, G.D. Boardman, S.R. Craig, E. McLean and G.J. Flick)

Utilization of Bacterial Floc Single Cell Proteins in Feeds for African Catfish and Tilapia (Eric De Muylder)

Effect of Solids Concentration on Performance of Indoor Bio-Floc Mesocosms (John A. Hargreaves and David Wong)

Algal/Bacterial Sedimentation, Degradation and Denitrification Rates in Suspended Culture Aquaculture Systems (David Brune)

Bio-Floc Dynamics in Super-intensive Shrimp Raceways: The Good the Bad and the Ugly (John Leffler, Heidi Atwood, Brad McAbee, Patrick Brown, Steve Morton, Susan Wilde and Craig Browdy)

Production of Marketable Size Penaeus vannamei in Greenhouse-Enclosed Raceways Operated with Limited Water Discharge (John J. Austin, Tzachi M. Samocha, Susmita Patnaik, Tim C. Morris and Yin Yiu)

Growth and welfare of nile tilapia oreochromis niloticus cultured in indoor tanks using activated suspension technique (AST) (M. Ekram Azim, David C. Little and Ben P. North)

Probiotic Effects of Bio-Floc Technology (Yoram Avnimelech and I. Bezerano)

Information: Yoram Avnimelech, Professor (Emeritus), Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Haifa, 32000 Israel (phone 972-3-7522406, fax 972-3-6131669, email agyoram@tx.technion.ac.il).

Information: John Cooksey, World Aquaculture Conference Management, P.O. Box 2302, Valley Center, CA 92082 USA (phone 760-751-5005, fax 760-751-5003, email worldaqua@aol.com, webpage www.was.org).

Source: Email and attachments from Yoram Avnimelech on November 8, 2006.



Feed Short Course
TOP OF PAGE


For the two days (February 25-26, 2007) preceeding "Aquaculture 2007" (February 27 to March 2, 2007) in San Antonio, Texas, USA, a practical short course titled "Aquaculture Feed Extrusion, Nutrition and Feed Formulation" has been scheduled. It is a course for new feed mill personnel.

Attendees of the feed short course will receive a complimentary pass to the "Aquaculture 2007" Trade Show and can register for "Aquaculture 2007" at the World Aquaculture Society member rate.


Feed Short Course Program
Sunday, February 25, 2007

Current and Future Market Trends in Aquaculture Feed (Peter Coutteau)

Introduction to Extrusion Technology (Joseph Kearns)

Feed Preparation Technology (Christoph Naef)

Grinding Aquatic Feeds (Mark Heimann)

Feed Pelletization (Mark Heimann)

Drying Aquafeed (Tom Barber)


Feed Short Course Program
Monday, February 26, 2007

Latest Technologies in Absorption Coating by Vacuum (Josef W. Barbi)

Feed Coating and Micro Encapsulation (Jacques C. Wijnoogst)

Production of Feeds for Shrimp (Eric De Muylder)

Environmental Issues: Noise and Odor Control (Jacques C. Wijnoogst)

Applications of Soy Protein Concentrates in Aquafeed (Don Lindsey)

High Fat Extrusion for Aquafeed (Joseph Kearns)

Aquatic Feed Extrusion: Applications of Twin Screw Extruders (Joseph Kearns)

Aqua Feed Quality Control: Chemical and Microbiological Aspects (Els Vanden Berge)

New Extrusion Technology with Online Control of Product Density and Specific Mechanical Energy Input (Christoph Naef)

Aqua Feed Quality: Lipid Oxidation and Palatability (Fernando Valdez)

Aquaculture Feeds: Technologies and Products (Alain Brisset)

Utilization of Soybean Meal in Both Freshwater and Marine Fish Feed Development (Michael Cremer)

Hygienic Feed Preparation--HACCP and GMP (Fernando Valdez)

U.S. Soy Industry's Support to Global Aquaculture: Research and Field Oriented Projects (Michael Cremer)

Registration Fee: Before January 25, 2007, $795; after January 25, 2007, $895. Rate includes short course manuals, lunch and coffee breaks.

Information: Dr. Sefa Koseoglu, President, Extraction and Refining Program Filtration and Membrane World LLC, 603 Southwest Parkway, Unit 23 College Station, Texas 77840 USA (phone 979-764-8360, fax 979-694-7031, email sefa@koseoglu.com, webpage www.membraneworld.com).

Information: Dr. Ignace Debruyne, ID&A, Haverhuisstraat 28, B-8870 Izegem, Belgium (phone 32-(0)51-31-12-74, mobile 32-(0)476-46-07-98, fax 32-(0)51-31-56-75, email aquafeed@scarlet.be).

Source: Aquafind. Aquafind Events Calendar (http://www.aquafind.com/info/calendar.php). 5th Practical Short Course on Aquaculture Feed Extrusion, Nutrition and Feed Formulation. Site visit on January 3, 2007.


Shrimp Farming in Texas--Map and Stats
TOP OF PAGE

Estimate Farm-Raised Shrimp
Production in Texas in 2006*
Farm
Postlarvae
Stocked
Animals
Harvested
Pounds
Harvested
Survival
Percent
Acres
Stocked
Arroyo AquacultureAssociation
(many owners)
43,400,000
15,969,386
702,229
38.80
185
Auswell Aqua Farm
17,216,116
7,199,470
348,873
41.82
84
Bowers Shrimp Farm
30,000,000
19,000,000
718,000
63.33
145
Bowers Valley Shrimp , Inc.
61,000,000
29,873,500
1,375,000
48.97
460
Harlingen Shrimp Farm
21,000,000
8,000,000
370,000
38.10
346
Junior Aquaculture Farm
18,000,000
8,424,000
312,000
46.80
72
Mengers & Sons Farm
70
0.1
Permian Sea Organics (estimate from 2005)**
1,000,000
700,000
20,000
70.00
20
Southern Star, Inc.
11,500,000
5,103,005
224,802
44.37
55
St. Martin's Seafood
51,400,000
21,851,292
890,673
42.51
220
TAES Flour Bluff (Bait Shrimp R&D)
945,000
320,000
7,000
33.86
2
Texas Seabreeze Shrimp Co.
2,400,000
1,003,579
42,000
41.82
12
Totals
257,861,116
117,444,232
5,010,647
45.55
1,601
* Source of Data: Dr. Ya-Sheng Juan, Texas Parks and Wildlife, Brownsville, Texas
** Permian Sea Organics' 2006 production could not be obtained, estimate not confirmed.




Information: Granvil Treece, Aquaculture Specialist, Texas A&M University, Sea Grant College Program, 2700 Earl Rudder Freeway South, Suite 1800, College Station, Texas 77845 USA (phone 979-845-7527, fax 979-845-7525, email g-treece@neo.tamu.edu, website http://texas-sea-grant.tamu.edu).

Texas Farm Leases Ponds
TOP OF PAGE



On December 11, 2006, I chatted with Bing Hung, president of Southern Star, Inc., formerly Hung Shrimp Farms, who said, "We're developing the first privately owned industrial park for aquaculture in the United States."






Southern Star has 63 ten-acre ponds and 94 five-acre ponds that it leases to aquaculturists. Right now all the ten-acre ponds are leased, but more than 50 of the five-acre ponds are available. Southern Star supplies the pond, water and discharge permit; and the tenant supplies seedstock, feed, equipment and labor. Tenants also pay their own energy bills. Hung encourages commercial ventures, but says his ponds also provide a good place to test products (like feeds, probiotics and aeration equipment), to do research, or to just test an idea.

Shrimp News: Do you lease any other facilities?

Bing Hung: Yes, we have 16 concrete ponds measuring 50 feet by 65 feet by 4 feet deep and 12 concrete ponds measuring 75 feet by 100 feet by 5 feet deep. In addition to that, we have 40,800 square feet of greenhouse space with a concrete floor that can be used for hatcheries.

Shrimp News: What is the source of your water?

Bing Hung: The Arroyo Colorado River, only four nautical miles upstream from the hyper saline Laguna Madre Bay. Our average salinity is around 5 to 15 parts per thousand and the water is rich in algae.

Shrimp News: Is farm labor available?

Bing Hung: Yes, we can get unlimited labor from Mexico at an average rate of $5.15 an hour. The State of Texas might raise this to $6.00 an hour soon.

Shrimp News: Is shrimp feed available?

Bing Hung: Yes, four big feed companies, Nutrena, Burris, Rangen and Zeigler Brothers deliver weekly or daily.

Shrimp News: How long do the leases run?

Bing Hung: For at least three years, beginning in January and ending in December.

Shrimp News: How much do you charge for a one-year lease on a five-acre pond?

Bing Hung: $5,000, plus $1,000 for the water assessment fee (a fuel charge for pumping water).

Shrimp News: What are the advantages of your site?

Bing Hung: It's in southern Texas, which has one of the best climates for growing fish and shrimp in the United States. Shrimp can be grown from March through November and fish all year long. There are three shrimp processing plants within thirty minutes. We own a nearby shrimp hatchery. We also have a very important water discharge permit. It's difficult to get new discharge water permits in Texas, especially at our location. We have 200-acre wetland to recycle waste water; our tenants don't have to worry about any water discharge issues. We take care of that.

An entrepreneur can start with twelve ponds and expand pond by pond as his business grows. Other entrepreneurs on the farm are doing the same thing, and they all help each other out. Shrimp farming is part of the culture in this corner of the state, and we provide a place where that culture can flourish.



Shrimp News: Is your offer open to foreigners?

Bing Hung: Yes, we started out just serving Texas companies, now we have people coming in from other states and overseas.

Shrimp News: Will you be at the World Aquaculture Society Meeting in San Antonio, Texas, USA, in February 2007?

Bing Hung: Yes, and I will talk with anyone interested in leasing ponds. I also invite everyone to visit our farm, it's about a four to five hour drive from San Antonio.

Information: Bing Hung, Southern Star, Inc., 35518 Marshall Hutts Road, Rio Hondo, TX 78583 USA (phone 956-748-2333, mobile 956-266-5495, fax 956-748-3600, email binghung2@aol.com).

Source: Bing Hung. Interview by Bob Rosenberry, Shrimp News International. El Cajon, California. December 11, 2006.



Texas Farm Sells Shrimp Online
TOP OF PAGE





Harlingen Shrimp Farms, Ltd., produced its first crop of shrimp in 1982. Its Bayview farm, one of five, is the oldest continuously operating shrimp farm in the United States.

Harlingen's operations are regulated by eight federal agencies, some of which use Harlingen as a model on how to do shrimp farming right.

If you have Google Earth, you can view the farm at latitude 26°--8'--56.76"--N; longitude 97°--18'--58.69"--W. The satellite image that you see was taken in the winter when the ponds were dry.

Here's the complete listing of Harlingen's "Texas Star" online shrimp products:

Harlingen's "Texas Star" Shrimp

Headless Frozen Shrimp
IFQ Tails in Bags
Size/Count
Weight
Regular Price
Sale Price
Shipping Weight
16/20
5 Pounds
$33.60
$25.10
7.5 Pounds
21/25
2 Pounds
$11.65
$9.30
3.7 Pounds
26/30
2 Pounds
$10.00
Sold Out
3.7 Pounds
31/35
5 Pounds
$22.00
$17.60
7.5 Pounds
Block Tails in Boxes
10/15
5 Pounds
$45.00
NA
9.5 Pounds
16/20
5 Pounds
$32.35
$25.88
9.5 Pounds
21/25
5 Pounds
$29.05
$23.25
9.5 Pounds
26/30
5 Pounds
$25.00
$20.00
9.5 Pounds
31/35
5 Pounds
$23.85
$19.05
9.5 Pounds
36/40
5 Pounds
$20.10
NA
9.5 Pounds
Head -On Frozen Shrimp
Frozen Blocks
13/15
4 Pounds
$18.60
NA
7.85 Pounds
16/18
4 Pounds
$15.40
NA
7.85 Pounds
19/21
4 Pounds
$12.99
NA
7.85 Pounds
IQF Boxes
10/15
40 Pounds
$150.00
NA
55 Pounds
16/20
40 Pounds
$105.00
NA
55 Pounds
Notes: Prices November 2006, subject to change. Mimimum online order 20 pounds. Several shipping options. Call or email for information on international shipments.



I purchased five pounds of Harlingen's 16/20s for $25.10, plus $36.98 for over-night shipping, which worked out to about $12 a pound. They were top quality.

Information: Fritz Jaenike, Harlingen Shrimp Farms, Ltd., 44099 Schafer Road, Los Fresnos, Texas 78566 USA (phone 956-233-5723, email hsfbayview@compuserve.com, website http://harlingenshrimp.com).

Sources: 1. Harlingen Shrimp Farms, Ltd. Website visit (http://harlingenshrimp.com) on November 10, 2006. 2. Telephone conversation with Brent Burkott, web administrator at Harlingen, on November 14, 2006. 3. Google Earth on November 6, 2006.



The History of Shrimp Farming in West Texas
By Granvil Treece
TOP OF PAGE


At one time, six shrimp farms in West Texas with almost 200 acres of ponds contributed significantly to the state's overall production of farm-raised shrimp. The challenge of operating in such a remote area, however, took its toll, and today only one farm remains.

In 1972, two Ward County, Texas, gravel pit operators, Hal Brown and Dean Phipps, asked the local county agent to help them explore the possibility of using saline ground water for aquaculture in some of their gravel pits.

In 1973 County Extension Agent Johnny Harris, with the assistance of Dr. James Davis and Dr. Jack Parker of Texas A&M University (both retired), stocked some shrimp in West Texas.

Early experiments were crude and little data were obtained-- other than survival rates, which indicated the biological feasibility of shrimp cultivation in West Texas.

Stocking continued and gradually a body of information was accumulated that supported commercial shrimp farming in West Texas.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s Vernon Holcomb, Jack Parker (not the Jack Parker mentioned above) and Charlie McKaskle all tried pilot-scale shrimp farms in West Texas. Holcomb's farm was in Stanton; Parker's in Crockett County near Iraan; and McKaskle's in Martin County. McKaskle produced commercial crops of shrimp in 1989 (810 pounds per acre) and 1990 (2,166 pounds per acre). The 1990 crop was from 4.2 acres of ponds, which yielded 9,100 pounds of shrimp. The farms closed for different reasons. Holcomb's aquifer dried up during a drought year. Parker's farm produced an average of 1,068 pounds per acre in 1989, but could not get viable seedstock the following year and the bank took the farm.

In 1991, Durwood Dugger conducted a feasibility study for the Pecos County Water District No. 3 entitled "The Feasibility of Aquaculture in Pecos County and Far West Texas".

In July 1992, Texas A&M University (TAMU), the Texas General Land Office, and Pecos County Water District No. 3 jointly opened a R&D Center in Imperial, Texas. Redfish and shrimp were grown at a pilot facility consisting of six, one-acre ponds. The R&D facility had some problems sealing its ponds the first year, but produced 1,140 pounds of shrimp. This pilot helped pave the way for a commercial group (Triton) from Florida to try shrimp farming in West Texas. In 1993 and 1994, Triton produced commercial crops of shrimp, but decided to sell the farm. C.E. Selinger of Odessa and a group from India purchased the farm from Triton and reopened it as Pecos River Aquaculture in 2001. Currently, the farm is leased, but not in production.

Production averages from the various farms in West Texas ranged from 3,000 to 4,500 pounds per acre. The highest production was with the Super Shrimp (Litopenaeus stylirostris) in 1996 at the Regal Farm, where 6,000 pounds per acre were produced.

The aquifer used by shrimp farms in the Imperial area is the Cenozoic Alluvium, water remaining from the Permian Sea. Salinity varies from 10 parts per thousand to 15 ppt. There are no fresh water zones in the area, and no discharge water leaves any farm. The water is too salty for agricultural uses. Red clay soils can be found in the area for lining ponds.


Bart Reid and Permian Sea Organics




Over the years, Bart Reid has played a pioneering role in West Texas shrimp farming, and today his farm in Imperial, Permian Sea Organics (formerly Permian Sea Shrimp Company), is the last of the shrimp farms. Reid has 64 surface acres of ponds, filled with a combination of tap and irrigation water from Pecos County Water District #3 and water from the aquifer. He is one of two shrimp farms in the USA that can sell USDA Certified Organic Shrimp.

In 2005, Reid stocked 20 acres and produced 20,000 pounds of shrimp. He stocked at low densities and raised the shrimp organically, feeding only 24 thousand pounds of feed, while the shrimp utilized the natural productivity in the ponds for additional nutrition. The survival for the 2005 crop was 70%.

Reid avoids chemicals and antibiotics, does not crowd his shrimp and uses organic feed. Marty Mesh, executive director of Florida Organic Growers (FOG) in Gainesville, Florida, said FOG certified the farm as "USDA Organic" because Reid followed all the rules. Reid thinks the "organic" label will help his products compete with the foreign shrimp flooding into the United States from Asia and Latin America. He says he can charge $5 a pound wholesale for his organic shrimp, compared with $2 for conventional shrimp.

Groundwater quantities are still unknown in West Texas and are a source of uncertainty to any operating farm. However, marketing the shrimp appears to be the biggest uncertainty and one of the biggest challenges. Some of the shrimp can be sold fresh at harvest to local markets, but that market is easily saturated. The organic certification of the shrimp opens up new markets as far away as California. Reid also sells his shrimp over the Internet or directly from his shrimp store and restaurant in Imperial.

If you have Google Earth (free, but you must download it from Google's website) installed on your computer, you can view Permian Sea Organics at latitude 31°, 16', 16.93" N; longitude 102°, 40', 48.35"W.

Information: For a list of West Texas saline groundwater references, contact Granvil Treece, Aquaculture Specialist, Texas A&M University, Sea Grant College Program, 2700 Earl Rudder Freeway South, Suite 1800, College Station, Texas 77845 USA (phone 979-845-7527, fax 979-845-7525, email g-treece@neo.tamu.edu, website http://texas-sea-grant.tamu.edu).

Source: Texas Aquaculture Association Website (http://www.texasaquaculture.org/index.html). Update on Inland Shrimp Farming in West Texas (http://www.texasaquaculture.org/id227.htm). Granvil Treece. Site visit on September 13, 2006.



Exhibitors
TOP OF PAGE

Company
Country
BoothNumber
ProductService
Acqua & Co. Srl
ITALY
120, 122
Aeration Equipment
Advanced BioNutrition Corp.
USA
718
Feeds and Health Products
Aeration Industries International, Inc.
USA
219
Aeration Systems
Aerway Manufacturing Company
USA
129
 
Air-O-Lator Corporation
USA
314
Floating Surface Aerators
AirTree Ozone Technology Co.
TAIWAN
102
Water Treatment Systems
Alchem Industries
CANADA
641
Fiberglass Aquaculture Equipment
Alicorp S.A.A.
PERU
114, 116
Aquaculture Feeds
Alltech Inc.
USA
223, 225, 324, 326
Feed Additives
American Tilapia Association
USA
142b
Association
aOvaTechnologies, Inc.
USA
424
Feed, Research
AQ1 Systems Pty Ltd
AUSTRALIA
625
Feeds & Nutrition
Aqua Bounty Technologies
USA
312
Diagnostic Kits
Aqua Logic, Inc
USA
103
Water Chillers
Aquacenter, Inc.
USA
719
Aquaculture Supplies
Aquacultural Engineering Society
USA
347
Association
Aquaculture Engineering Group, Inc.
USA
240
 
Aquaculture Magazine
USA
643
Publication
Aquaculture Systems Technologies, LLC
USA
507, 509
Filters, Pumps
Aquafauna Bio-Marine, Inc.
USA
125
Hatchery Feeds & Supplies
Aqualine AS
NORWAY
619, 621
Sea Cages
AquaMaof Technnologies Ltd.
ISRAEL
642
 
Aquaneering, Inc.
USA
419, 421
Equipment, Tanks
Aquatic Eco-Systems, Inc.
USA
203, 205, 302, 304
Equipment Catalog Company
Aquatic Health Resources, LLC
USA
215, 217
Fish Vaccines
Aquavan Technology Inc.
TAIWAN
137
 
AREA
USA
402, 404, 406
Aeration Equipment
Armada Systems, Inc.
USA
107
Net Cleaning Systems
Artemia International LLC
USA
704
Feeds, Supplies, Services
Atlantium Technologies Ltd.
ISRAEL
541
Water Treatment
Bentoli AgriNutrition Inc.
USA
524, 526
Feed Additives
BIOMIN
USA
440
Probiotics, Feed Ingredients
Biscayne Aquaculture
USA
417
 
Blackwell Publishing
USA
321
Publications
Campbell Scientific, Inc.
USA
706
Water Quality Monitors
Cargill Animal Nutrition
USA
517, 519, 521,
616, 618, 620
Nutritional Services & Feeding Programs
Carlisle SynTec Incorporated
USA
106
 
CLEPCO / Cleveland Process Corp.
USA
105
Immersion Heaters
Colorado Lining International
USA
414
Geosynthetic Products
Colorite Plastics
USA
131
Aeration Systems
Conforma Clad Inc.
USA
525
Feed Preocessing Equipment
CPM Roskamp Champion
USA
104
 
D & T Fiberglass Inc.
USA
546
Fiberglass Tanks
Dae Yang Air Stone Ind., Co.
KOREA
730
Air Stones
Delstar Technologies, Inc
USA
412
Plastic Netting
Delta Hydronics, Inc.
USA
341
Water Heating/Cooling Systems
Diamond V Mills
USA
714
Yeast Culture Products
DSM Dyneema
USA
540
Net and Rope Fiber
DSM Nutritional Products
USA
527
Nutrition and Health Products
E.S.E. & INTEC (Midland Companies)
USA
134
Feed & Process Equipment
Eagar, Inc
USA
313
Fisheries Supplies
Elsevier
USA
443
 
Emperor Aquatics, Inc.
USA
514
Water Filters, Sterilizers
Environmental Technologies, Inc. - ETI
USA
128
Pumps & Feed Systems
Epicore Bionetworks Inc.
USA
207
Biological products
Ewing Irrigation & Industrial Products
USA
510
Feed Pumps, Tanks, etc.
Extru-Tech, Inc.
USA
711
Equipment for Feed
FeedMed Ltd.
USA
346
Feed Additives
Firestone Specialty Products
USA
738
Synthetic Rubber Liners
Fish Farming International
ENGLAND
624
International Monthly Publication
Fish Farming News
USA
325
Publication
Forestry Suppliers, Inc.
USA
626
Water Instruments
Fresh-flo Corporation
USA
607
Aerators, Graders
Fybroc Division
USA
703
Centrifugal Pumps
Global Aquaculture Alliance
USA
247
Association
Griffin Industries, Inc.
USA
213
Feed Ingredients
GSE Lining Technology, Inc.
USA
615
Liquid Containment Systems
GTC Nutrition
USA
726
 
H. M. Johnson & Associates
USA
349
Market Research Services
Hach Environmental
USA
442
Water Analysis Equipment
Hatchery International
CANADA
425
Publication
HDR|FishPro
USA
716
Professional Services
House Manufacturing Company, Inc.
USA
211
Aerators
IDC Westinghouse
USA
441
Outdoor Lighting
IMCOPA
BRAZIL
736
 
In-Situ Inc.
USA
315
Water Monitoring Equipment
Integrator Aqua Systems, Inc.
USA
112
Oxygen Monitoring & Control Systems
Intermas Nets SA
SPAIN
627
Extruded Nets
International Business Wales
UK
115, 117, 119, 121, 214, 216, 218, 220
Trade Organization
International Filter Solutions
USA
411, 413
Filters
International Ingredient Corporation
USA
204
Ingredients for Feed
InterNet, Inc.
USA
713
Plastic Netting
INVE Aquaculture, Inc.
USA
603, 605
Feeds and Nutrition
ITT Advanced Water Treatment-Royce Technologies
USA
725
Dissolved Oxygen Monitors
Kasco Marine, Inc.
USA
317
Aeration Equipment
Keeton Industries
USA
303, 305
Water Systems, Filters
Magic Valley Heli-Arc & Mfg.
USA
420
Pumps, Tanks, Equipment
Maine Aquaculture Association
USA
640
Association
Marine Biotech, Inc.
USA
426
Aquatic Research Systems
MariSource
USA
307
Vertical Incubators
Melick Aquafeed, Inc.
USA
708
Aquaculture Feeds
Museum Apparel
USA
547, 549
Promotional Apparel
Nanrong (Shanghai) Co., Ltd.
CHINA
542
Equipment & Machinery
National Aquaculture Association
USA
136, 138, 140, 142
Association
Nelson & Sons, Inc. / Silver Cup Feeds
USA
723
Aquaculture Feeds
Northwest Marine Technology, Inc.
USA
320
Marking & Tagging
Nutricil São Pedro Agro Industrial Ltda.
BRAZIL
108
Shrimp Feeds
Oceanic Institute
USA
118
Research & Consulting
Octaform Systems Inc.
CANADA
733
PVC Systems
Omega Protein, Inc.
USA
318
Feed Supplements
Pacific Ozone Technology
USA
343
Ozone & Oxygen Generators
Panorama Acuícola Magazine
MEXICO
143
Publication
Parkway Research div. of Brandt Consolidated
USA
206
Lake & Pond Dye
Pilot Company Limited
TAIWAN
208
Aquaculture Machinery
Point Four Systems, Inc.
CANADA
512
Aeration/Oxygenation Equipment
PolyTank Inc.
USA
520
Tanks
Poultry Protein & Fat Council
USA
617
Poultry Products
PRAqua Group Ltd.
CANADA
717
Design & Engineering Group
PRILABSA International
USA
728
Artemia, Feeds & Equipment
Process Technology
USA
513
Immersion Heating Equipment
Promens
USA
720
Storage Containers
R & B Aquatic Distribution, Inc.
USA
503, 505, 602, 604
Water Quality Control
Rangen, Inc.
USA
610
Aquaculture Feeds
Red Ewald, Inc.
USA
503a, 505a, 602a, 604a
Fiberglass Products, Tanks
Reed Mariculture
USA
306
Aquaculture Feeds
Reef Industries, Inc.
USA
309
Liners
RK2 Systems Inc
USA
202
Filters, Generators, Pumps
Salt Creek Inc.
USA
408
Feeds for Aquaculture
Schering-Plough Corporation
USA
224, 226
Pharmaceutical - Vaccines
Seabait Limited
UK
702
Maturation Feeds & Fishing Baits
Signal Corporation
TAIWAN
125a
Probiotics, Aerator, Turnkey Service
Skretting
CANADA
109
Nutrition and Services
Smith-Root, Inc.
USA
132
Products, Services, Equipment
Sort-Rite International
USA
319
Shrimp Processing
Striped Bass Growers Association
USA
142c
Association
Syndel Laboratories Ltd.
CANADA
612a
Fish Reproduction Technology
Tanaka Sanjiro Company, Ltd.
JAPAN
221
Tanks, Heaters, Meters
Taylor & Francis Group
UK
209
Publisher
Ten Cate
USA
427
Containment Netting
Texas Hunter Products
USA
124
 
The ROAN Group, Inc.
USA
609
Health Products
Therion International, LLC
USA
606
DNA-based Testing Service
Toshi Pump Co., Ltd.
KOREA
732
Diaphragm Air Pumps
U.S. Soybean Export Council
USA
721
Trade Organization
U.S. Trout Farmers Association
USA
142a
Association
Uniscope, Inc.
USA
308
Pelleting Agents
United-Tech, Inc.
USA
110
Bacteria & Enzyme Formulas
USDA / National Agricultural Statistics
USA
139
Publisher of Agricultural Statistics
Vertex Water Features
USA
310
Aeration Systems
Water Garden Gems
USA
415
Filters, Pumps, Plants
Water Management Technologies Inc.
USA
705, 707
Microscreens, Feeders, Oxygen Injection
Waterco/Baker Hydro Div.
USA
239, 241, 340, 342
Filtration Equipment
Wenger Manufacturing, Inc.
USA
543
Equipment for Feed Mfg.
Western Chemical / Syndel
USA
612
Drug Manufacture
Wisconsin Flowgate & Culvert Co Inc
USA
311
Water Control Structures
Wofford Electric & Pump Supply
USA
608
Wholesale Electrical Distributor
YSI, Inc.
USA
416, 418
Water Monitoring Equipment
Yunker Plastics, Inc.
USA
724
Fabrics, Liners, Covers
Zeigler Bros., Inc.
USA
130
Feeds