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Country Reports

Australia

Attempts to Copyright Shrimp

 

Worldwide, shrimp breeders are developing genetically superior stocks through selective breeding.  Now they need ways to protect their improved stocks from genetic poachers.  To date, there have been two principal approaches to achieve genetic protection.  The first approach relies on inbreeding depression to compromise the performance of progeny produced from unlicensed breeding, while the second attempts to confer reproductive sterility.

 

The concept of using inbreeding depression for genetic protection involves supplying farms with elite stocks that are closely related.  To be successful, this approach requires that the pedigrees of the stocks remain unknown to farmers.  Breeding of these stocks results in rapid increases in inbreeding and puts progeny at risk of inbreeding depression.

 

Conferring reproductive sterility in shrimp can provide genetic protection by preventing the production of viable progeny.  Typically, reproductive sterility is achieved using techniques such as polyploidy and irradiation.  In addition to providing genetic protection, these techniques can have other benefits that the inbreeding approach does not provide.

 

Induction of reproductive sterility provides a method of genetic containment, preventing cultured escapees from genetically contributing to natural fisheries populations.  Polyploidy approaches can also bias sex ratios among populations, which can be used to improve production in sexually dimorphic species such as shrimp.  Female shrimp grow larger than male shrimp, so stocking ponds with predominantly female stocks significantly improves production.

 

In Australia, significant investments are being made to advance the understanding of the underlying biochemical and genetic processes that control fertility and sex in penaeid shrimp.  At the same time, industry-focused research is investigating techniques to produce reproductively sterile, all-female shrimp populations through such technologies as polyploidy, irradiation and genetic engineering.

 

The term polyploidy refers to the number of chromosome sets in a cell.  In the normal diploid state, each somatic cell has two chromosomes, one from each parent.  Ploidy induction is the manipulation of the number of chromosomes in a cell, which can be achieved by applying induction shocks or changes in environmental conditions during early embryonic development.

 

The ploidy levels achieved through induction are species specific and determined by the timing, duration and magnitude of the induction shock.  Typically, ploidy induction produces triploid or tetraploid (three and four sets of chromosomes, respectively), rather than the usual two.  Ploidy induction can occur sporadically in nature and is currently used by the salmon and oyster farming industries to confer desirable commercial traits such as reproductive sterility and skewed sex ratios.

 

Triploid induction has been successful for several shrimp species, including Penaeus chinensis, P. indicus, P. japonicus and P. monodon.  Triploidy has been achieved by applying shock agents timed to stop meiosis-2, the final nuclear division before mitosis.  In chinensis and japonicus, the two species in which this technique has been thoroughly studied, triploid shrimp are predominantly female (100% in japonicus) and always reproductively sterile.  Studies have also found that triploid shrimp have growth and survival comparable to diploids.  Despite this, however, the technique is highly variable in the number of spawning inductions that result in some triploids and the number of triploid progeny produced within the spawning.  This variability in frequency and efficiency has limited the uptake of triploid induction technologies by the commercial shrimp industry.

 

Researchers at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) in Australia recently discovered an alternative approach to produce triploid shrimp that has a 100% induction frequency.  This technique applies a shock agent immediately after eggs are released from the female, preventing meiosis-1 from occurring.  The success of this method is reliant on the rapid automated detection of spawning and gentle handling of the newly spawned eggs.

 

Despite 100% induction frequency, induction efficiencies are still variable.  They are currently being optimized in an attempt to consistently produce over 80% triploids.  For fail-proof genetic protection, induction efficiencies need to be 100%.  From a production perspective, however, triploidy induction rates of 80% could provide substantial improvements in pond production because triploid shrimp are female and grow larger than males.

 

The mating of tetraploids with diploids has proven successful in producing 100% triploids in other aquaculture species and could be an alternative solution to the variable induction efficiencies of direct triploidy induction in shrimp.  To date, however, only Professor J.H. Xiang’s group at the Chinese Academy of Science in Qingdao, China, and CSIRO in Australia have reported successful tetraploid induction in shrimp.  Both groups found that tetraploids were not viable.

 

Polyploidy research at CSIRO is currently directed toward refining triploid induction technologies for Australia’s most commercially important species, P. monodon.  Key focus areas are the optimization of induction efficiency to 80%, assessment of triploid shrimp performance when grown in ponds and development of commercial-scale automated induction systems.

 

Source: The Global Aquaculture Advocate (http://www.gaalliance.org).  Editor, Darryl Jory (dejry2525@aol.com).  Selective Breeding/CSIRO Research Evaluates Technologies to Produce Genetically Protected, All-Female Shrimp.  Melony J. Sellars (Ph.D., email melony.sellars@csiro.au) and Nigel P. Preston (Ph.D.).  CSIRO Food Futures National Research Program, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, P.0. Box 120 Cleveland, Queensland 4163, Australia.  Volume 11, Issue 1, Page 52, January/February 2008.

 

Australia

Two Jobs—Lobster Farming

 

Lobster Harvest, Pty., Ltd., seeks two aquaculture technicians for its project in Exmouth, Western Australia, where it is developing leading-edge lobster aquaculture technologies.

 

Applications should be addressed to Victoria Bentwood-Long, HR Officer, MG Kailis Group, P.O. Box 382, Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia 6160 (email victoriabentwood-long@kailis.com.au).  Closing date: March 28, 2008.

 

Source: FisheNews (an email supplement to Austasia Aquaculture magazine, http://www.austasiaaquaculture.com.au).  Editor, Tim Walker (austasiaaquaculture@netspace.net.au).  Employment/Aquaculture Technicians.  March 19, 2008.

 

Australia

Gold Coast Tiger Prawns

 

Gold Coast Tiger Prawns, owned by Noel Herbst, covers 347 hectares and has 34 ponds, each stocked with 400,000 shrimp.  His product won Outstanding Excellence awards at the 2004 and 2005 Sydney Royal Fine Food Show.  The farm produces approximately 450 metric tons a year, ten percent of Australia’s total production of farmed shrimp.  Its processing plant can handle eight tons a day—250,000 shrimp.  Its shrimp hatchery also produces barramundi (a finfish) and, more recently, cobia (also a finfish).  The farm has been operating since 1983 and was one of the first farms to successfully breed shrimp.

 

Source: FisheNews (an email supplement to Austasia Aquaculture magazine, http://www.austasiaaquaculture.com.au).  Editor, Tim Walker (austasiaaquaculture@netspace.net.au).  Prawns/Gold Coast Tiger Prawns.  March 6, 2008.

 

Belize

Agenda for Shrimp Farming Dialogue Meeting

 

Here is the draft agenda for the World Wildlife Fund’s Shrimp Aquaculture Dialogue Meeting set for April 1-2, 2008, in Belize City.

 

Tuesday Morning, April 1, 2008

 

8:30—Registration.

 

9:00—Opening ceremony.  Sylvia Marin, WWF-Central America, and a representative from the Belizean Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries.

 

9:45—What are the goals of the Shrimp Aquaculture Dialogue?  Eric Bernard, WWF.

 

10:15—Coffee break.

 

10:30—Overview of the farmed shrimp market in the United States and Europe.  Philip Chou, Seafood Choices Alliance.

 

11:00—Overview of disease and health management issues related to farmed shrimp.  Dr. Carlos Pantoja, University of Arizona.

 

11:30—What are the goals of this meeting?  Eric Bernard, WWF.

 

12:15 to 1:30—Lunch at the Radisson.

 

Tuesday Afternoon, April 1, 2008

 

1:30—Breakout sessions to define criteria and propose indicators for International Principles 1 to 4:

 

Farm Siting

Farm Design

Water Use

Broodstock and Postlarvae

 

3:00—Coffee break.

 

3:15—Continued: Breakout sessions to define criteria and propose indicators for the first four principles.

 

4:15—Group discussion to finalize criteria and agree on draft key indicators for principles.

 

5:00—Cocktail reception at the Radisson.

 

Wednesday Morning, April 2, 2008

 

9:00—Overview of the day’s agenda.  Eric Bernard, WWF.

 

9:15—Breakout sessions to define criteria and propose indicators for International Principles 5 to 8:

 

Feed Management

Health Management

Food Safety

Social Responsibility

 

10:30—Coffee break.

 

10:45—Continued: Breakout sessions to define criteria and propose indicators for principles 5 to 8.

 

11:45—Group discussion to finalize criteria and agree on draft key indicators for principles 5 to 8.

 

12:30 to 1:30—Lunch at the Radisson.

 

Wednesday Afternoon, April 2, 2008

 

1:30—Define roles and objectives of Steering Committee and elect committee.  Eric Bernard, WWF.

 

2:30—Discuss adopting principles and criteria and drafting indicators.

 

3:30—Coffee break.

 

4:00—Next steps for Steering Committee.

 

4:30—Closing ceremony. Alvin Henderson (shrimp farmer), Sylvia Martin (WWF-Central America) and a representative of the Belizean Ministry of Aquaculture and Fisheries.

 

5:00—Adjourn.

 

Notes: Moderators will be identified prior to the meeting.  Each presentation will be followed with a ten-minute question and answer session.

 

Information: Jill Schwartz, Senior Communications Officer, Aquaculture World Wildlife Fund, 1250 24th Street, NW Washington, DC 20037 USA (phone 202-822-3458, cell 202-290-6526, fax 202-861-8324, email jill.schwartz@wwfus.org, webpage www.worldwildlife.org).

 

Source: Email to Shrimp News International from Jill Schwartz at the World Wildlife Fund.  Subject: Belize Meeting.  March 13, 2008.

 

India

Mangrove Restoration a Fiasco

 

Stung by criticism that forest officials in Bhitarkanika National Park in the northeast state of Orissa promote and patronize unauthorized shrimp farms, the park authorities began a $65,000, mangrove regeneration project on nearly 5,000 hectares.  It turned out to be an absolute fiasco.

 

There are no visible signs of mangrove regeneration activity in the core forest area, and shrimp farms have sprouted up on the land where the forest personnel claimed to have planted mangroves saplings.  Shrimp farmers moved in a month after the mangroves were planted.

 

Conservationists believe that regeneration schemes in other deforested areas of the Mahanadi Deltaic Region of the Bhitarkanika National Park will meet the same fate.

 

Source: Kalinga Times.  What ails mangroves in Orissa Sanctuary? (http://www.kalingatimes.com/orissa_news/news2/20080305-Orissa-coast.htm).  Manoj Kar Kendrapara.  March 5, 2008.

Malaysia

State of Perak to Legalize Shrimp Farming on Government Land

 

In the state of Perak (northwest Malaysia on the Andaman Sea), the government is in the process of legalizing shrimp and fish farming on government land, where it is already taking place without authorization.  Farmers will be given 30-year leases.

 

Source: The Star Online.  Fish breeders and prawn rearers to be legalised in stages (http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2008/3/6/nation/20080306175706&sec=nation).  Hah Foong Lian.  March 6, 2008.

The Netherlands

Dr. Likpe B. Holthuis (1914–2008)

 

Charles Fransen (fransen@naturalis.nnm.nl): Dear friends and colleagues, it is with great sadness that I have to inform you that Dr. Likpe B. Holthuis, emeritus Curator of the National Museum of Natural History in Leiden, The Netherlands, passed away on March 7, 2008.  He was 86.

 

Professor Holthuis started working at the museum in 1941 and continued working there until four weeks ago.  He was married to Crustacea.

 

He was very disciplined and productive, bequeathing an immense collection of over 600 scientific publications that described hundreds of new taxa.  He received an award from the Crustacean Society for Excellence in Research and was an honorary member of various societies.  As the curator of Crustacea at the museum, he built the decapod collection into one of the best in the world.  He collected everything related to Crustacea.  One of his greatest passions was his carcinological library which holds many rare books and is almost complete with regards to the Decapoda.

 

The void left by Likpe is immense.

 

Information: Charles Fransen, Researcher/Curator Crustacea, Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum Naturalis, P.O. Box 9517, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands (phone 31-71-5687613, fax 31-71-5687666, email fransen@naturalis.nnm.nl, webpage http://science.naturalis.nl/fransen, courier address Naturalis, Darwinweg 2, 2333 CR Leiden, The Netherlands).

 

D’Udekem D’Acoz (Cedric.Dudekem@sciencesnaturelles.be): There is a saying which states that the death of an old man is like the burning down of a library.  This is especially true in the case of Professor Holthuis, who knew everything about Decapod systematics and a lot on other groups of crustaceans.  His knowledge was truly encyclopedic, and he was always willing to share it with us.  He cannot be replaced, especially today, in an era where classical taxonomy is so often disparaged.

 

Source: The Crust-L mailing list (To subscribe, send an email to LISTPROC@VIMS.EDU.  In the body of the email, put SUBSCRIBE CRUST-L).  Subject: [CRUST-L, 3381 and 3385] Prof. L.B. Holthuis.  March 8 and 10, 2008.

Northern Mariana Islands

Saipan SyAqua Aquaculture

 

Rommel G. Catalma, operations manager at Saipan SyAqua Aquaculture, a small shrimp farm on the island of Rota, says the farm has started an expansion that will triple its size, from 16,000 square feet of tank space to 48,000 square feet.  The new tanks will be bigger and deeper, ideal for producing large shrimp.

 

The expansion started in early February 2008, and Catalma hopes to start stocking the new tanks by mid-April 2008.

 

The expansion will include four large growout tanks, two nursery tanks, a deep well, a filtration system and a 50,000-gallon reservoir.

 

Catalma said: “The system is being designed to have very minimal water discharge to conform with Best Aquaculture Practices.  Our target is to discharge not more than ten percent of our total water volume in a five-month culture period.”

 

“Our target is to produce 8,000 to 10,000 pounds per month before the end of 2008.  The new tanks will also produce bigger-sized shrimp because that is where the demand is biggest.  Target size will be 13-15 count per pound.”

 

“The demand from Christmas to the Chinese New Year was beyond what we expected.  Not wanting to disappoint customers, we started selling smaller-sized shrimp, hoping to catch up with production when demand slowed down.  But that never happened.  Restaurants are asking for more, hotels are ordering more, the Sabalu Market sales keep climbing up, and there are more walk-in customers at the farm.”

 

Saipan SyAqua reassessed the situation and concluded that the only way it could catch up was to stop selling until the shrimp got to the desired size and biomass.

 

Saipan SyAqua will start selling shrimp again at the Sabalu Market on March 22, 2008.  “By that time our shrimps will be much bigger and the supply more consistent,” said Catalma.

 

Source: Saipan Tribune.  Shrimp farm goes full blast with expansion (http://www.saipantribune.com/newsstory.aspx?cat=1&newsID=77738).  Mark Rabago.  March 7, 2008.

 

Norway

New Artemia Replacement

 

At VICTAM Asia 2008, a trade show for the feed industry (Bangkok, Thailand, March 2008), Blue Limit AS, a Norwegian aquaculture company, displayed a new shrimp larval feed called “Brilliant Blue” to replace Artemia in shrimp hatchery feeds.

 

Information: Anders Aksnes, Nofima Ingredients, Kjerreidviken 16 N-5141, Fyllingsdalen, Norway (phone 55-50-12-44, email aksnes@fiskeriforskning.no).

 

Source: FishUpdate.com.  New aquaculture feed presented to conference (http://www.fishupdate.com/news/fullstory.php/aid/10269/New_aquaculture_feed_presented_to_conference.html).  March 7, 2008.

 

United Kingdom, Wales

Black Heads, Red Heads and Exploding Heads

 

Mark Rigby, Llyn Aquaculture, Wales, UK (mark@aquacommerce.com): After cooking shrimp from our closed indoor system, we get between 10 to 50 percent “black heads”.  Some call it “exploding heads”, but that’s a bit extreme!  A better name would be “brown head.”  We’ve tried all sorts of purging regimes and various cooking methods, but so far, none have worked.  The tails taste great and the color is nice and red, but the black heads could put some people off.  No doubt it has something to do with the hepatopancreas rupturing during cooking.  How can we minimize this?

 

PS: Our output is running at 15 kilos a square meter per cycle of 20 to 25-gram animals!

 

Craig Collins (desertshrimp@hotmail.com): I believe that’s the reason that head-on shrimp are treated with metabisulfite.

 

Georges Razafindrabe (rageo_9265@yahoo.fr): You use metabisulfite to avoid melanosis, 
not to treat black head.

Alberto Olias (a.olias@liptosa.com): LIPTOSA has a product for treating black head.  It’s fully natural.

Eric De Muylder (eric.de.muylder@skynet.be): Georges is right.  Black head has nothing to do with melanosis, which can be prevented with metabisulfite or natural products like rosemary extract.  Black head is probably linked to the hepatopancreas and what the shrimp ate before harvest.  In intensive floc systems, the risk is that they have consumed a lot of flocs before harvest.  This can also happen in semi-intensive systems when shrimp consume cyanobacteria.  There is a simple solution to this problem.  For more information, contact me at eric@crevetec.be.

 

Agung (asetiarto@yahoo.com): I don’t think black head (my preference is “red head”) has anything to do with the culture system.  We have an intensive system without bacterial floc and still face this problem.  It may have something to do with temperatures during processing.

 

Hervé Lucien-Brun (hlub@wanadoo.fr): The black head problem can be caused by several factors.  I wrote an article about the causes of black head that was published in the September 2006 issue of the Advocate (http://www.gaalliance.org/maga.html).  The most common cause is harvesting shrimp when their hepatopancreas are full.

 

Definitely this problem has nothing to with the melanosis, which can be controlled with sodium metabisulfite.

 

Black head cannot be controlled during the cooking process.  Cookers in Europe, mostly in France and in Spain, have tried to control it by various cooking techniques, but so far, they have not succeeded.  Black head is more common in Asia where the farming is intensive, and there’s a lot of organic matter in the water and on the bottom of the pond.

 

One of the best techniques for correcting black head is to put the shrimp in a tank with clear water and a clean bottom so that they purge their hepatopancreas before cooking, a technique used successfully by some Chinese processors.

 

Michel Autrand (michel.autrand@wanadoo.fr): Black head (or red head after cooking) is usually linked to the feed (natural or artificial).  It can be linked to water quality and pond bottom conditions.  Sometimes the quality and level of lipid in the feed can affect the hepatopancreas and may lead to bursting during cooking.

 

Agung (asetiarto@yahoo.com): Thanks for the explanation by Eric and Michel.  However, our ponds are plastic lined and regularly siphoned, so the accumulation of organic matter can be minimized.  We also use a commercial diet with a moderate level of fat.  Do you think the level of fat in the diet has anything to do with black head?

 

Antonin Jamois (antosiomaj@yahoo.fr): Black head (or “green head”, as I like to call it) is due to the explosion of the hepatopancreas during cooking.  Depending on what is in the hepatopancreas, the head becomes greenish or brownish.

 

Red head is often due to temperature abuse between harvest and processing.  If the period is too long or the temperature to high, the head becomes red.  This can also happen after processing if the shrimp experience temperature abuse.  The red head is only seen on frozen or fresh shrimp and disappears when cooked.

 

Eric De Muylder (eric.de.muylder@skynet.be): Georges is right.  Black head has nothing to do with melanosis, which can be prevented with metabisulfite or natural products like rosemary extract.  Black head is probably linked to the hepatopancreas and what the shrimp ate before harvest.  In intensive floc systems, the risk is that they have consumed a lot of flocs before harvest.  This can also happen in semi-intensive systems when shrimp consume cyanobacteria.  There is a simple solution to this problem.  For more information, contact me at eric@crevetec.be.

 

Agung (asetiarto@yahoo.com): I don’t think black head (my preference is “red head”) has anything to do with the culture system.  We have an intensive system without bacterial floc and still face this problem.  It may have something to do with temperatures during processing.

 

Hervé Lucien-Brun (hlub@wanadoo.fr): The black head problem can be caused by several factors.  I wrote an article about the causes of black head that was published in the September 2006 issue of the Advocate (http://www.gaalliance.org/maga.html).  The most common cause is harvesting shrimp when their hepatopancreas are full.

 

Definitely this problem has nothing to with the melanosis, which can be controlled with sodium metabisulfite.

 

Black head cannot be controlled during the cooking process.  Cookers in Europe, mostly in France and in Spain, have tried to control it by various cooking techniques, but so far, they have not succeeded.  Black head is more common in Asia where the farming is intensive, and there’s a lot of organic matter in the water and on the bottom of the pond.

 

One of the best techniques for correcting black head is to put the shrimp in a tank with clear water and a clean bottom so that they purge their hepatopancreas before cooking, a technique used successfully by some Chinese processors.

 

Source: The Shrimp List (a mailing list for shrimp farmers).  Subject: Black heads.  January 28–31, 2008.

United States

Alaska—Commercial Seafood Consumer Protection Act (also see Hawaii, below)

 

The Commercial Seafood Consumer Protection Act—a bipartisan bill introduced in early March 2008 by Senator Ted Stevens (R-Alaska) and others would create a program to test, track and inspect much more of American’s seafood supply, 80 percent of which comes from other countries.  Stevens said, “We’re worried about the public health aspects of this because we’re told the USA inspects only 1.6 percent of the imported seafood, while the European Union inspects 20 percent.”

 

“This bill would increase the number of seafood inspectors and laboratories that are entitled to inspect and certify seafood.  It would require greater inspection of seafood facilities and allow USA inspectors to travel overseas to determine the level of seafood safety methods used by exporters to ensure they are compatible with our laws.”

 

The bill would be coordinated by NOAA and the FDA.  Funding to implement the program has been authorized at $15 million through 2013.

 

Source: Seafood.com (an online, subscription-based, fisheries news service).  Seafood inspections bill aims to improve safety.  Editor and Publisher, John Sackton (phone 781-861-1441, email jsackton@seafood.com).  March 5, 2008.

 

United States

Florida—Job

 

Job Description: Manage a research-oriented shrimp maturation facility in Florida

Salary: Around $40,000 a year with benefits

Closing Date: Tuesday, May 13, 2008

Qualifications: B.S. in biological sciences (M.S. preferred), along with four years experience in shrimp maturation

Conditions: Do not apply if you are not a USA citizen or legal resident

Contact: jobsaquaculture@yahoo.com

 

Source: AquaNic (The Aquaculture Network Information Center, a gateway to the world’s electronic aquaculture resources, http://aquanic.org/index.htm).  Jobs Directory (http://www.aquanic.org/Text/job_serv.htm) In cooperation with the WAS Employment Service.  Search jobs (http://aquanic.org/jobs/search.asp).  Shrimp Maturation and Research (http://aquanic.org/jobs/jobinfo.asp?jobid=2771).  Posted: March 7, 2008.

 

United States

Hawaii—Job, Cyanotech Corporation, Algae Culture

 

Cyanotech Corporation, a world leader in producing high-value products from microalgae, is seeking a technician for the laboratory-scale production of microalgae, including the maintenance of stocks, nutrient solutions and water chemistry tests.  Bachelors Degree required, B.S. in Biology preferred.  Position is full time (non-exempt, hourly) and comes with a generous benefits package.  Compensation will be commensurate with experience.  Mail, fax or email resume to: Cyanotech Corporation, 73-4460 Queen Kaahumanu Highway #102, Kailua-Kona, HI 96740 USA (fax 808-329-3597, tcole@cyanotech.com).  Closing date: March 21, 2008.

 

Source: Hawaii Aquaculture News.  Editor, Jim Szyper (phone  808-938-4872, email jszyper@hawaii.edu).  Job Opportunity/Microalgal Culture.  Volume 2, Number 1, Page 1, March 2008.

United States

Hawaii—Commercial Seafood Consumer Protection Act (also see Alaska, above)

 

On March 5, 2008, Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee Chairman Daniel K. Inouye (D-Hawaii) issued the following statement after introducing a bipartisan bill that would help ensure that seafood products distributed in the United States are fit for consumption.

 

The Commercial Seafood Consumer Protection Act will help prevent such contaminated seafood from ever reaching the mouths of consumers.

 

The Commercial Seafood Consumer Protection Act would work to ensure that seafood in the United States is fit for human consumption by strengthening the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) fee-for-service seafood inspection program (SIP).  Specifically, the bill would increase the number and capacity of NOAA laboratories that are involved with SIP under the National Marine Fisheries Service.

 

The bill would further direct the Secretary of Commerce and the Secretary of Health and Human Services to work together to create an infrastructure that provides a better system for importing safe seafood.  This new system would provide a means to inspect foreign facilities and examine and test imported seafood.  It would also provide technical assistance and training to foreign facilities and governments.

 

It would expedite seafood imports from countries that consistently maintain high standards!

 

Source: Seafood.com (an online, subscription-based, fisheries news service).  Sen. Inouye says Americans must be confident of the safety of their seafood.  Ken Coons (phone 781-861-1441, email kencoons@seafood.com).  Editor and Publisher, John Sackton (phone 781-861-1441, email sackton@seafood.com).  March 5, 2008.

United States

Massachusetts—Shrimp Vaccines

 

Boston...On March 10, 2008, Replikins, Ltd., announced development of a chemically synthesized vaccine specific to the Taura virus.  When the vaccine was administered orally to shrimp, 91% survived a challenge by the Taura virus.  The specificity of the protective effect was established in control groups by chemically blocking the active regions in the vaccine, and as a result the protective effect was lost in the control groups.  The effectiveness of this vaccine, along with its rapid production cycle (7 days), represent an important proof of concept for developing vaccines against a range of rapidly replicating, highly lethal viruses.

 

Replikins is forming a division to focus on lethal shrimp viruses and is also pursuing development of synthetic vaccine products.

 

Information: Samuel Bogoch, MD, PhD, Chairman, Replikins Ltd., 38 The Fenway, Boston, MA 02215 USA (phone 646-320-5910, email sbogoch@replikins.com, webpage http://www.replikins.com).

 

Source: Replikins Ltd., News Release/Replikins oral vaccine synthesized in 7 days protects 91% of shrimp against a lethal virus.  Attachment to an email.  March 10, 2008.

United States

Missouri—Global Aquaculture Alliance

 

The Global Aquaculture Alliance, an international, nonprofit trade association dedicated to advancing environmentally and socially responsible aquaculture, has named three new directors to its 12-member board:

 

1. John Peppel, a senior vice president for animal nutrition at Cargill (USA), replaces Cargill’s Manuel Santana, a longtime GAA board member who resigned.

 

2. Erwin Sutanto is operations director of P.T. Central Proteinaprima (Indonesia), one of the largest shrimp operations in the world.  He fills an open seat.

 

3. Antonio Piňo Gomez-Lince is the general manager of Promarisco, S.A. (Ecuador), an international supplier of shrimp.  He replaces longtime GAA board member Peder Jacobson, who in addition to serving on GAA’s executive committee, served on the GAA board since its inception in 1996.

 

In addition, longtime board member Rick Martin was appointed to the group’s executive committee.  Martin, a 40-year veteran of the seafood industry, is executive director of the Red Chamber Group, the largest producer and importer of shrimp from facilities certified by GAA’s Best Aquaculture Practices standards.  He is also the president of Gourmet Fisheries and Meridian Seafoods, which he founded in 1976 and built into successful enterprises.

 

According to George Chamberlain, GAA’s co-founder and president, the addition of the new members to the board and executive committee strengthens an already stellar board of directors.  He added: “We are pleased that these individuals, who are leaders in their professions, have accepted our invitation to help guide our organization over the next several years.  At the same time, we are grateful for the incredible leadership that Peder Jacobson has shown from the very beginning to where we are today.”

 

“Our position as the global standards setter for aquaculture is due, in large part, to the commitment of people like Peder.  While we will miss him on the GAA board, at the same time, we will be honored to work with him as he focuses his attention on the work of the Aquaculture Certification Council.”

 

Information: Sally Krueger, Assistant Director, Global Aquaculture Alliance, 5661 Telegraph Road, Suite 3A, St. Louis, Missouri 63129 USA (phone 314-293-5500, fax 314-293-5525, email sallyk@gaalliance.org, webpage http://www.gaalliance.org).

 

Source: Global Aquaculture Alliance.  News Release/Aquaculture Standards Setter Global Aquaculture Alliance Names New Board Members.  March 10, 2008.

 

United States

New York—Seamark USA, Price Sheet

 

Seamark USA, a shrimp distributor, offered the following prices during the first week of March 2008.  In Bangladesh and United Kingdom, Seamark’s processing plants have British Retail Certification.

IQF* HLSO** EZ Peel Tiger Shrimp
Packaging 10 x 2 pounds
Origin Bangladesh
Brand Tiger/Mr. Prawn
Sizes Prices
8/12 $9.20
13/15 $7.30
16/20 $5.75
21/25 $5.00
26/30 $4.40
31/40
No Stock
* Individually quick frozen
** Headless, shell-on
IQF* PD** Tail-on Tiger Shrimp
Packaging 10 x 2 pounds
Origin Bangladesh
Brand Tiger/Mr. Prawn
Sizes Prices
8/12 $10.80
13/15 $7.80
16/20 $6.45
21/25 $5.50
26/30 $4.65
31/40
$4.25
* Individually quick frozen
** Peeled and deveined

 

 

Terms and Conditions

 

Direct containers from Bangladesh are available.

All prices are quoted FOB, Brooklyn, New York.

Prices change weekly.

Prices Subject to change without prior notice.

Minimum order, ten cartons.

Retail Ready, Printed Bag.

Deliveries in New York and New Jersey.

 

Information: Sunil Joshi, Seamark USA, Inc., 516 Scholes Street, Brooklyn, NY 11237 USA (phone 718-418-7706, fax 718-418-7707, email sales@seamarkusa.com, webpage http://www.seamark.co.uk).

 

Source: Email to Shrimp News International from Seamark USA, Inc.  Subject: From Seamark USA/Current Price List.  March 11, 2008.

United States

Washington State—TraceRegister and Wal-Mart

 

Philip Werdal, president of TraceRegister, Inc., a tiny Seattle software company, is helping retail giant Wal-Mart guarantee that its farmed shrimp is safe to eat.

 

TraceRegister generated $200,000 in revenue in 2007 and employed seven people.  Werdal, whose experience has more to do with seafood than software, believes that growing consumer concern about contaminated food from China and elsewhere means people want to be able to trace the origins of the food they eat.

 

TraceRegister allows them to do just that by providing seafood buyers such as Wal-Mart with an Internet-based tool that will specify every step farm-raised seafood takes, from growout to the retail counter.

 

“There are good operators in China and bad operators in China.  Our product allows people to make that distinction, between the good operators and the poor ones.  The intent of the product is to promote integrity in the food supply,” said Werdal.

 

Werdal is also part owner of Seattle-based Jubilee Fisheries, Inc., which operates three catcher/processor vessels, fishing mostly for bottomfish, cod and black cod in the North Pacific.  He and several partners also own Kroner, a related company that does some seafood processing in China.

 

TraceRegister manages the Aquaculture Certification Council’s computerized certification system, and Wal-Mart certifies its shrimp through ACC.  Jim Heerin, president of ACC, said the council chose the TraceRegister system partly because of Werdal’s seafood experience.

 

Heerin said the Aquaculture Certification Council has certified 130 seafood-producing facilities through the TraceRegister system, which uses a world map to display each step in the production process, so that end users can track their product from farm to processing plant.

 

Information: Grethel O’Leary, TraceRegister (phone 206-621-7304, email goleary@traceregister.com).

 

Source: Puget Sound Business Journal.  Tiny Seattle software company helps retail giants track their food.  Steve Wilhelm (phone 206-876-5427, email swilhelm@bizjournals.com).  February 22, 2008.

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